Harry Cline

Harry
Cline
Editor,
Western Farm Press

Harry's 33-year journalism career covers both daily newspapers and agricultural magazines. He was Western Farm Press' first editor and has more than 25 years of experience covering all aspects of high value, irrigated Western agriculture. He is a former member of the California Chapter of the American Society of Agronomy executive council and recipient of the 1993 recipient California Agricultural Production Consultants Association's Outstanding Contribution to California Agriculture. Born 7-7-43, Jacksonville, Fla. Raised in Texas where he attended the University of Texas. Worked for newspapers in Texas and Arizona before moving to California in 1975 to begin career as Western agricultural journalist. Received awards for feature writing and headline writing from Arizona Press Club. Married: 2 children, three grandchildren. Lives in Fresno, Calif. Contact Cline at Western Farm Press, 7084 Cedar Avenue, No. 355, Fresno, CA 93720. Phone (559) 298-6070. Fax (913) 514-3641.

Articles
Palmer amaranth resistance spreads in Texas High Plains
Glyphosate-resistant palmer amaranth was identified in seven West Texas High Plains counties along the New Mexico border last cotton growing season, up from one county the year before, reports Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service weed specialist Paul Baumann.
Chad Crivelli is 2013 Farm Press High Cotton Award winner for Far West region
Chad Crivelli grew his first cotton crop in 1995 as an FFA project. He was the first-ever national fiber crop award winner from California — and he’s been growing cotton ever since.
California research playing key role in rice production increase
Rice production worldwide must increase 30 percent to 40 percent within the next three decades to feed those additional 2 billion people. California may be only a bit player in world rice production; however, the Biggs RES has long been a world leader in developing rice varieties and rice production systems.
Cotton price hangover lingers
The cotton high price party has long been over, but the hangover lingers on. The cotton industry could continue to suffer from the impact of mills failing to fully honor their contracts, according to Kevin McDermott, vice president/senior manager for cotton merchant Jess Smith and Sons, Bakersfield, Calif.
Don Cameron: High Cotton Award winner for Western region
In recognition of his leadership in California agriculture, and his accomplishments in cotton production, Don Cameron, Helm, Calif., was selected as winner of the 2012 Farm Press/Cotton Foundation High Cotton Award for the Western states.
Door left open for RR alfalfa planting this fall
A federal judge has left the door open to planting Roundup Ready alfalfa through this fall when he denied a request from a radical environmental group to halt the sale of seed because it violated the Endangered Species Act.
U.S., Mexico trucking agreement re-opens border to trade
The long-haul trucking agreement between the United States and Mexico should represent a major boost in California agricultural exports to its neighbor to the south.
MRL issues challenging booming U.S. agricultural exports
The growing number of countries flexing their regulatory muscle has created a labyrinth of regulations that growers, PCAs and processors must navigate to ship products overseas without being penalized. This not only includes knowing what residue levels are permitted at each destination, but what chemicals are registered in which countries.
Pima cotton remains strong with almost half of 2011 crop sold
With the current Pima crop virtually sold out, and with prices continuing to stay high for the new crop, the current forecast for new crop production certainly looks to fall far short of old production levels and records
GPS signals at risk as FCC battle rages
Agriculture is in the thick of a fierce battle being waged before the FCC to pull the plug or at least modify a company’s effort to bolster its cellular network at the expense of the integrity of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals.
Wild cotton market ride may be repeated for 2011-2012 crop
The last thing a bull rider wants after getting turned inside out by a volatile bovine is to get right back on the same large farm animal.
Cotton checkoff program clearly working well
It is “abundantly clear” that the federal Cotton Research and Promotion Program checkoff program has benefited U.S cotton producers, importers and government stakeholders.
RR alfalfa’s advantages far outweigh disadvantages
The legal labyrinth took four years to maneuver, but RR alfalfa is back on the market. The same radicals that halted sales four years ago will reportedly sue USDA for approving RR alfalfa without proper consultation with the Fish and Wildlife Service.
Roundup Ready alfalfa available for spring planting
Roundup Ready alfalfa planting seed will be on the market in time for spring planting season after the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) unexpectedly granted non-regulated status for the herbicide resistant forage crop.
New herbicide resistant traits coming to cotton fields
There is no pipeline full of new herbicides headed your way to stem the growing problem of weeds resistant to glyphosate or any other herbicide for that matter. However, representatives of the major chemical companies developing new cotton varieties told growers and others at the recent Beltwide Cotton Conference in Atlanta that they are developing new varieties resistant to a trio of older herbicides.
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