SAN ANTONIO – An article on a speech by Neal Gillen at the Texas Cotton Association annual meeting in San Antonio should have listed Illinois as a state that might be hotly contested in the upcoming U.S. Senate races.

The story indicated Gillen, executive vice president of the Washington-based ACSA, believed that Republicans might have difficulty holding on to the Senate race in Arizona where Sen. John McCain, the incumbent, currently holds an 80 percent approval rating.

The quotes from the article, which appeared on southwestfarmpress.com and Farm Press Daily, should have read as follows.

"While the Republicans barely control the Senate with a 51 to 49 majority, the number of Democrat seats up for election and the retirement of popular incumbents will work against the Democrats in 2004. There will be 34 Senate races this year, 19 seats are held by Democrats and the Republicans hold 15. Ten of the 19 Democrat seats are in states that President Bush won in 2000, while only three of the 15 Republican seats will be contested in states won by Gore.

"At this time the Republicans have three seats open, in Colorado, Illinois and Oklahoma, given the retirements of Ben “Nighthorse” Campbell, R-Colo.; Peter Fitzgerald, R-Ill.; and Don Nickles, R-Okla. The Democrats, however, have five open seats in Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, and South Carolina due to the retirements of Bob Graham, D-Fla.; Zell Miller, D-Ga.; John Breaux, D-La.; John Edwards, D-N.C.; and Ernest “Fritz” Hollings, D-S.C.

"While it may prove difficult for the Republicans to hold the Colorado and Illinois seats, the Oklahoma seat should remain in Republican hands. The Republicans have a good chance of winning the seats being vacated in Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina and they will be competitive in the Florida and Louisiana races.

"The Republicans should gain a minimum of one seat, but with the right candidates and a favorable trend could gain upwards of three seats. Keep in mind that this is how the Senate situation looks today. It can, and it will change, and the presidential election could be a controlling factor."

“We sincerely regret the error and any disservice to Mr. Gillen and Senator McCain,” said Ron Smith, editor of southwestfarmpress.com.

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