An international consortium, led by Professor Andrew Paterson of the University of Georgia, has made publicly available the first ‘gold-standard’ genome sequence for cotton. 

Cotton was among the first plants studied at the molecular level, and the sequence obtained by Paterson and his team is the culmination of a 20-plus year effort in the analysis of cotton genes and genomic DNA.

This critical sequence will be invaluable to better understanding and optimizing the production and sustainability of the cotton plant.

The research effort of Paterson and others gained momentum in 2007 when a proposal from 22 leading cotton scientists representing the world’s seven largest cotton-producing nations was approved by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) Community Sequencing Program. 

The study established the strategy that was used for ‘gold-standard’ sequencing of the New World cotton progenitor, Gossypium raimondii; which was chosen by the worldwide cotton community to be the first of 50 cotton species to be sequenced. 

“This achievement, and the ongoing research community annotations of our cotton genome, will speed continued improvement of cotton production and help sustain one of the world’s largest industries,” said Professor Paterson.

The cotton sequence is among the highest-quality flowering plant sequences yet produced. A novel strategy integrating “next-generation” and conventional sequencing methods was used.