Cotton organizations expressed disappointment in the House’s failure to pass a bill many felt would be of significant benefit to the industry.

National Cotton Council Chairman Jimmy Dodson, a South Texas cotton producer, said, “U.S. farmers need a stable, long term policy in order to continue to make the substantial investments necessary to continue to adopt new technology necessary to provide safe, affordable food and fiber to U.S. processors and consumers and to maintain competitiveness in world markets.

“The U.S. cotton industry is deeply disappointed that the House failed to approve the legislation approved by the Agriculture Committee on a strong bipartisan vote after two years of extensive debate and consideration of hundreds of amendments.”

"This legislative package adequately met the needs of cotton producers across the Cotton Belt, and was the best we could have expected in this budgetary climate," Plains Cotton Growers President Craig Heinrich, a cotton grower from Slaton, Texas, said. "This bill saved money, reformed and streamlined programs, and gave farmers assurance that they could continue to grow food and fiber to feed and clothe this nation and the world, and it is a shame that it could not make it to conference where some key differences could have been resolved." 

PCG Executive Vice President Steve Verett expressed appreciation to the House Agriculture Committee on both sides of the aisle for their efforts. "… Chairman Frank Lucas, Ranking Member Collin Peterson, Subcommittee Chairman Mike Conaway and the entire House Ag Committee have done everything they could to cut the deficit, reduce the size and scope of government, and achieve necessary reform through the creation of this farm bill," Verett said. "They are to be commended, and we will continue to stand behind them as we all work to pass a five-year bill that works for agriculture to support America's economy." 

Other commodity groups also expressed disappointment.

Texas Farm Bureau President Kenneth Dierschke said, “Congress must not give up on this vital legislation. Texas Farm Bureau will continue working with the House Agriculture Committee and Texas delegation to complete this bill and ensure essential risk management tools are in place to allow farmers certainty both now and in the future.”

The United Fresh Produce Association said the defeat of the bill “leaves questions as to future of farm programs.

“We felt we had a very strong bill for specialty crops that was supported by members from both sides of the aisle,” said Robert Guenther, United Fresh senior vice president of public policy. “We strongly encourage the House Leadership and the House Agriculture Committee to get back together and bring back to the House floor a bill that can pass before the current extension expires at the end of September.”