For muscle cuts from animals slaughtered in the U.S., the consumer can expect to see four different labels:

  • “Born, raised, and slaughtered in the United States,” for animals that spent their whole life in the U.S.;
  • “Born in Country X, raised and slaughtered in the United States,” for animals that were born outside the U.S. but spent some time in the U.S. before slaughter. It is to be understood that if an animal was born in Country X, some of the raising took place in that country;
  • “Born and raised in Country X, slaughtered in the U.S.,” for animals that were imported into the U.S. for immediate slaughter;
  • “Born and raised in the United States, raised in Country X, slaughtered in the United States,” for animals that were born and raised in the U.S., raised in another country, and then slaughtered in the U.S.

“As stated in the March 12, 2013, proposed rule, under the current COOL regulations, imported muscle-cut covered commodities retain their origin as declared to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection at the time the products entered the United States (i.e., Product of Country X) through retail sale.” However, if there is documentation of the three production steps, muscle cuts that were slaughtered outside the U.S. can use the “born, raised, and slaughtered” format.

Daryll E. Ray holds the Blasingame Chair of Excellence in Agricultural Policy, Institute of Agriculture, University of Tennessee, and is the Director of UT’s Agricultural Policy Analysis Center (APAC). Harwood D. Schaffer is a Research Assistant Professor at APAC. (865) 974-7407; Fax: (865) 974-7298; dray@utk.edu and hdschaffer@utk.edu; http://www.agpolicy.org.

 

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