“Agriculture faces a major challenge in getting the various stakeholders to find common ground and finish a comprehensive, long-term farm bill,” Murphy continued.

“This policy adjustment demonstrates that ASA is committed to working with other commodities as well as both the Senate and House Agriculture Committees to support a safety net that can work for all farmers. It also addresses the need to provide savings for deficit reduction and make farm programs more defensible, while ensuring that our farmers have the risk management and crop insurance safety net they need.”

In addition to modifying its position on risk management policy, ASA continues to support extending the Marketing Loan Program, eliminating the ACRE program, and reducing or eliminating Direct Payments, provisions which were included in last year’s Senate and House farm bills.

ASA also supports the Senate version of the cotton STAX program.

 

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ASA urges the Agriculture Committees to protect the current crop insurance program as the foundation of the farm safety net, and to adopt improvements that would make it a more viable risk management tool for producers of all commodities in all regions of the country.

Recognizing differences between commodities and growing regions, and depending on cost, ASA will support allowing producers to choose between higher Target Prices under the decoupled CCP program if they forego eligibility for SCO, or a higher premium subsidy under SCO if they forego eligibility under the CCP.

“Providing options has been a priority for some producers, who prefer a choice of programs over a ‘one size fits all’ approach,” Murphy said.

“We recognize that ASA is making a significant change in our policy recommendations” said ASA First Vice-President Ray Gaesser, a soybean farmer from Corning, Iowa.

“But we must accept budget realities and the need to find additional savings if we are going to get a new farm bill done. Agriculture is the only sector that has been willing to reduce spending for deficit reduction.

“We’re prepared to make adjustments, provided we have policies that maintain a viable safety net for farm income and preserve planting flexibility.”

ASA represents all U.S. soybean farmers on domestic and international issues of importance to the soybean industry. ASA’s advocacy efforts are made possible through voluntary farmer membership by farmers in 30 states where soybeans are grown.

 

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