Storm fronts brought much needed rain and cooler temperatures to some parts of Texas.

However, the fronts left other drought-stricken areas – notably the southern half of the state -- high and dry, according to the National Weather Service.

Even where there was rain, substantial accumulations were spotty as of the morning of July 21. While some isolated areas received 3 inches or more, accumulations were less than 1 inch most everywhere else.

Record high temperatures – as high as 108 degrees in the southern parts of the state – further stressed crops and livestock. For the Southwest and other regions, the summer of 2009 was shaping up to be the hottest, driest one on record, according to Texas AgriLife Extension Service personnel.

More information on drought in Texas can be found at the Web site of the Drought Joint Information Center.