The final U.S. peanut crop report for 2010 shows an estimated production of 4.16 billion pounds, up 5 percent from earlier forecasts and up 13 percent from 2009. Planted acres are forecast at 1.29 million acre, up 15 percent from 2009.

Area harvested is estimated at 1.26 million acres, up 16 percent from the previous crop year. Average yield is estimated at 3,311 pounds per acre, up 169 pounds from the previous forecast but down 110 pounds from 2009. Still, considering drought conditions in the Southeast, the 2010 average yield is higher than many expected it to be.

Production in the Southeast States, including Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi and South Carolina, is estimated at 3.20 billion pounds, up 4 percent from the previous forecast and up 13 percent from 2009. Planted area is estimated at 986,000 acres, up 16 percent from 2009. Harvested area is estimated at 957,000 acres, up 16 percent from the previous crop year.

Average yield in the region is estimated at 3,340 pounds per acre, up 140 pounds from the previous forecast but 88 pounds lower than the 2009 average yield. Yields are up from the previous crop year in Florida, Mississippi and South Carolina but yield is down from last year in Alabama.

In Georgia, the leading peanut-producing state, the yield of 3,560 pounds per acre ties the record-high yield achieved in 2009. The excellent yields in Georgia can be attributed to intensive irrigation and new varieties that are proving to be more resistant to drought.

 Virginia-North Carolina production is estimated at 273 million pounds, up 5 percent from the previous forecast but down 5 percent from 2009. Planted area is estimated at 105,000 acres, up 33 percent from the previous crop year. Area for harvest, which is estimated at 104,000 acres, is up 33 percent from 2009. The average yield is estimated at 2,627 pounds per acre, up 163 pounds from the previous forecast but down 1,073 pounds from 2009. Hot, dry weather conditions during the growing season stressed the crop in the region and resulted in poor yields.