Feral hogs cause serious problems with agricultural production, from row crops to hay crops to livestock and wildlife. And concerns are only growing, said a Texas Cooperative Extension specialist.

"Coping with Feral Hogs" meeting will be held at 6 p.m. May 1 in the Founder's Room of the Student Center on the South Plains College campus in Levelland, said Ken Cearley, Extension wildlife specialist.

The meeting will cover problems associated with feral hogs, their biology and behavior, and ways to minimize losses, Cearley said. Speakers also will discuss disease considerations and legal issues.

"If you don't have hogs on your place right now, it may just be a matter of time before you do," he said. "Farmers and ranchers, as well as landowners in general, could benefit from knowing the full array of control options available so they can utilize the ones best suited to their individual needs."

Texas has the largest feral hog population in the U.S., estimated at more than 2 million, Cearley said.

"Even areas thought to be unattractive to feral hogs due to the lack of abundant surface water, such as the arid Big Bend region, have turned out to host significant numbers," he said. "So, I guess we shouldn't be surprised they've shown up in the western Panhandle and South Plains."

Continuing education units for attendees will be available through the Texas Department of Agriculture. For more information, contact Cearley at 806-651-5760, or Chris Edens, Extension agent in Hockley County, at 806-894-3159.