Because of the wet fall last year, some farmers may not have planted all the seed they had planned in 2009. But Erick DeWolf, plant pathologist with Kansas State University Research and Extension, said that certified wheat seed treated with a fungicide might still be usable. He said the two main issues to consider are the germination quality of the seed and the viability of the seed treatment.

"Assuming the seed was stored under dry conditions and did not get wet, the germination quality of the seed will likely be fine," said DeWolf. He recommended getting a germination test on the seed to verify the viability seed lot before planting.

Storage in a dry environment also helps preserve the effectiveness of a fungicide seed treatment. "The fungicide seed treatment should still provide protection from common bunt, loose smut and other seed- borne diseases, as well as whatever soil-borne diseases are on the label for the product used to treat the seed," said DeWolf.