At its May 21 meeting in Austin the Texas Animal Health Commission finalized proposed rule amendments concerning Chapter 40 dealing with Chronic Wasting Disease, Chapter 41 dealing with Fever Ticks, and Chapter 55 titled Swine, and issued two proposed rules concerning the movement of breeding cattle from Idaho, Montana and Wyoming.

Two proposed amendments to Texas Animal Health Commission rules concerning Brucellosis (Section 35.4).

The first proposed amendment would establish an entry permit and post-entry test requirement for breeding cattle entering Texas from Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming. Brucellosis has been found in cattle and domestic bison herds near Yellowstone National Park in the three states, and in wild elk and bison populations both in and outside of the park. All post-entry testing will be conducted at the owner's expense.

The proposal would require all breeding bulls and sexually intact female cattle from the three states to be tested for brucellosis 60 to 120 days after arrival unless they are entering for immediate slaughter or feeding for slaughter in a feedlot. Heifers from those states must test negative for brucellosis 30 to 90 days after their first calving.

TAHC officials say while Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming animal health officials have developed management plans to address the risk of brucellosis spread within their states, this amendment was proposed to further guard against the reintroduction of cattle brucellosis into Texas.

The second amendment to Section 35.4 would remove the identification requirements at change of ownership for beef cattle from the brucellosis chapter. At the next Commission meeting, a new proposal will be made to place animal identification requirements for adult beef cattle in a new Animal Disease Traceability (Chapter 50). The existing dairy cattle ID requirements were not proposed for change.

Texas animal health commissioners set a public comment period beginning June 14 and lasting through July 15 at their May 21 gathering in Austin to provide Texas cattle breeders and the public the opportunity to voice their concerns over the proposed rule changes.

Also during their May 21 meeting, the Commission proposed amendments to Chapter 40, titled "Chronic Wasting Disease" (CWD). This chapter provides for a voluntary CWD Herd Certification Program within Texas for species that are susceptible to the disease.

In December, 2012, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services (USDA-APHIS-VS) adopted an interim final rule establishing a national CWD Herd Certification Program with minimum requirements for interstate movement of deer, elk, and moose. As a result the Commission is making amendments to the Texas program to fully meet the federal program requirements. Passage of the proposal should allow the Texas cervid industry continued access to interstate markets, as regulated by USDA APHIS. Participation in the program remains voluntary.

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Other rule changes proposed by the Commission include an amendment to Chapter 39 to include new forms of acceptable treatment for Scabies, a proposed rule change to Chapter 43 recognizing a new blood test recently approved by USDA for Cervid Tuberculosis, and a proposed rule change to Chapter 50 establishing new state standards for facilities that may identify livestock moving interstate as per a new USDA traceability rule.

Comments on the proposed regulations must be submitted in writing to Carol Pivonka, Texas Animal Health Commission, 2105 Kramer Lane, Austin, Texas 78758, by fax at (512) 719-0721, or by e-mail to comments@tahc.state.tx.us. A detailed explanation of each rule proposal, including can be found on the TAHC web site at http://www.tahc.state.tx.us/regs/proposals.html.

TAHC issues final approval for previous proposed amendments

In addition to these proposed amendments, other rules were adopted at the May 21 meeting as proposed in a January session of the Commission. They included amendments to Chapter 40, titled "Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD)," Chapter 41, titled "Fever Ticks," and Chapter 55, titled "Swine."

The amendment to Chapter 40, "Chronic Wasting Disease," repealed and replaced Section 40.5, "Elk Testing Requirements," with a new Section 40.5, "Movement Requirements for CWD Susceptible Species." This amended rule changes the current surveillance requirements for intrastate movement of elk, and adds surveillance requirements for red deer and Sika deer.

The rule will require individuals wishing to move species susceptible to CWD to establish an inventory with the TAHC, test 20 percent of eligible mortalities, and submit a movement record that includes the official identification numbers of animals being moved. The test age for this program is set at 16 months, similar to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department's white-tail deer breeder program.

The amendment to Chapter 41, "Fever Ticks," was in Section 41.9, "Vacation and Inspection of a Premise." The amended rule will require that all cattle in the Permanent Quarantine Zone be identified with permanent official identification and be presented annually for inspection.

The amendment to Chapter 55, "Swine," was in Section 55.5, "Pseudorabies." This amended rule updates the testing timeframe for releasing swine that have been quarantined for exposure to Pseudorabies. This is in accordance with the USDA-APHIS-VS National Pseudorabies Eradication Program. The change to Section 55.5 will now allow swine to be released from quarantine with one negative herd test not less than 30 days from removal of the last reactor.

For more information, visit www.tahc.texas.gov or call 1-800-550-8242.

 

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