The USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) has received $4 million through its Emergency Watershed Protection program to fulfill some of the requests for assistance in repairing streambanks and waterways damaged in spring floods in eight counties in central Texas.

“We received more than $9 million in requests from local governments in north Texas to repair damage caused after heavy rains caused extensive flooding,” said Don Gohmert, NRCS state conservationist for Texas. “With the funding we received, we will be able to take care of the most serious needs at this time and have requested additional funding.”

Heavy spring rains caused flooding in nine central Texas counties. NRCS has committed all of its available funding to Callahan, Eastland, Ellis, Hill, McLennan, Navarro, Tarrant, and Wilson counties.

The purpose of the Emergency Watershed Protection program is to undertake emergency measures for runoff retardation and soil erosion prevention to safeguard lives and property from floods, drought, or any other natural occurrence that is causing or has caused a sudden impairment of a watershed.

NRCS will provide up to 75 percent of the funds needed to restore the natural function of a watershed. Local sponsors who request assistance pay the remaining cost-share, which can be provided by cash or in-kind services.