Texas grain producers, depending on location, are off to either a good start or a challenging planting season, according to Texas Cooperative Extension reports.

Dr. Gaylon Morgan, Extension small grains specialist in College Station, said planting conditions have been relatively good for the early-planted wheat in the Central Texas Blacklands because of cooler average temperatures and adequate soil moisture.

However, in the northern Rolling Plains some early-planted wheat is beginning to show signs of moisture stress, he said.

Planting began Sept. 1 in the Central Texas Blacklands and Rolling Plains regions for producers using wheat as a forage crop or dual-purpose wheat. Wheat that will be used for grain has not begun to be planted yet. That will begin in about two weeks depending on moisture conditions, Morgan said.

Brent Bean, Extension agronomist in Amarillo, said about half of the wheat has been planted in the Panhandle.

“We had some rain about three weeks ago that allowed many producers to plant their dryland wheat,” he said. “Wheat is now being planted under irrigation following corn harvest. After the next good rain, I am sure more dryland wheat will be planted. Early-planted wheat, however, has had some problems with fall armyworms in this area.” Grasshoppers and grubs have also been seen in some fields,” Morgan said.

Nearly all wheat is dryland in the Rolling Plains area.

“Although producers are hoping for high yields and good quality crops this year, it is too early to predict,” Morgan said.