Bayer CropScience has released a new transgenic stripper cotton variety, FiberMax 5024BXN, that combines the genetics of a new stripper cotton variety with the weed control ease and flexibility of the BXN System.

“FiberMax 5024BXN will allow producers to use the BXN system in a variety well adapted to the High Plains cotton growing region,” says David Becker, seed breeder with Bayer CropScience in Lubbock.

“The variety will be competitive with other transgenic and conventional stripper varieties in terms of yield and quality, and it has excellent storm resistance, which is an important agronomic characteristic for the High Plains.”

The variety is being grown this season on limited acres enabling a few growers to test it under standard field conditions. Steven Albracht, a Hart, Texas, grower has grown FiberMax varieties for several years and likes the new stripper variety because of fiber quality and yield.

“Grades are always better than other varieties.” he says. “That makes me money. Some buyers are paying a premium for quality.”

BXN varieties have made broadleaf weed control much more convenient and cost-efficient than conventional systems. “The ability to spray Buctril directly over the top is a big advantage,” says Andy Hurst, product manager for cotton herbicides, Bayer CropScience.

“Additionally, there is such a wide window in terms of when Buctril can be applied over the top that it gives growers tremendous flexibility in weed control throughout the season.”

Buctril can be applied over the top of BXN varieties from emergence until 75 days prior to harvest. Target weeds include morningglory and nightshade.

“The FiberMax 5024BXN will be available in full commercial quantities for the 2003 growing season. Growth characteristics include: medium to early maturity, storm resistance, competitive yields, good fiber quality and transgenic weed control.

“Because of demand from growers, we are continually searching for new and better biotechnologies to introduce into superior germplasm,” says FiberMax sales manager Lee Rivenbark.