With exports now accounting for 75 percent of U.S. cotton sales, Cotton Incorporated, the producer-funded research and promotion arm of the cotton industry, has developed a new, more export-oriented, Fiber Competition Division.

The new division merges what were previously the company’s Fiber Quality Research and Fiber Management Research Divisions into one integrated entity that is aimed at maintaining U.S. cotton’s dominance in the textile industry both at home and abroad.

Additionally, the company has created an Engineered Fiber Selection China Task Force – a group of highly trained staff members that will work to educate Chinese textile manufacturers to efficiently manage their raw cotton fiber by using EFS computer-based software developed by Cotton Incorporated.

“As the world’s textile manufacturing continues to move overseas, U.S. cotton faces enhanced global competition from other nations’ cottons, as well as from other fibers,” says Cotton Incorporated CEO J. Berrye Worsham. “To meet this challenge, we are realigning to better meet our corporate objectives.”

Michael Watson, formerly Cotton Incorporated’s vice president, fiber quality research, will lead the Fiber Competition Division, assuming the title of vice president, fiber competition. “Mike’s knowledge of fiber-quality issues and extensive experience in international cotton markets will serve the company well,” Worsham said.

The newly-formed EFS China Task Force will be headed by Charles Chewning, who was formerly Cotton Incorporated’s vice president, fiber management research. His new title is vice president, EFS Marketing, China.

With the help of other task force members, Chewning will educate Chinese manufacturers about the many advantages of implementing the EFS System – the world’s leading cotton management system for producing consistently high-quality yarns and even running laydowns – into their operations.

“The China market will be key to the future of U.S. cotton and the EFS System is an important tool in securing a strong share for U.S. cotton in international mills,” adds Worsham.

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