The National Corn Growers Association expressed concern about the impacts on farmers of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s newly released and long-awaited endangerment finding on greenhouse gas emissions in relation to climate change.

“The release of EPA’s findings is a significant development of the agency’s move forward in its effort to regulate greenhouse gas emissions,” NCGA President Darrin Ihnen said. “NCGA continues to have serious concerns with using the Clean Air Act to regulate GHG’s and the implications this could have for America’s corn farmers.”

The agency’s final determination comes in response to a 2007 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that ordered the agency to reconsider whether greenhouse gases are pollutants subject to regulation under the Clean Air Act. However, the court stated EPA must determine if these pollutants would threaten public health and welfare before being allowed to regulate. The six greenhouse gases subject to regulation are carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons and sulfur hexafluoride.

“The livestock industry is also particularly concerned with certain production facilities that will fall within regulatory parameters,” Ihnen said. “The intended purpose of the Clean Air Act was never to regulate every farm in America as part of the overall effort to curb greenhouse gas emissions.”

The finding is not expected to include any proposed regulations, but will pave the way for several pending EPA rules.