Hello!

I just finished reading your article on farm safety, and it hits home with my family. My husband's cousin was killed at age 15 when trying to pull a stump out. He was the only one home and didn't have things hooked up properly, causing the tractor to flip over and kill him. His parents came home and found him, which destroyed them.

Just this past Memorial Day weekend, dear friends of ours lost their 3-year old son. Dad was raking hay with little Brian on his lap like they had done so many times before, since Brian liked to help his daddy with their “busy work.” They hit a groundhog hole and Brian was thrown off and run over. It has been a terrible time for the family and all that know and love them. They are getting through with a strong faith in God and lots of loving friends and family.

Like you say, farmers cherish their children; we also expect more from them. My husband and I both grew up on farms and were driving tractors before thinking about a driver's license. We have an 11-year old son who does not drive our tractors yet. We have discussed teaching him, but kids these days are not as mature as we were years ago, and we decided that when he master's driving the “Gator,” we will move on from there.

We are constantly reminding him to be careful, but on a farm, things happen so fast. While I want all children on every farm to always be safe, you can't put them in a bubble. Someone said to me after our friends lost their son that farmers shouldn't have their kids with them when they work, they should put them in daycare. My response was that most farmers can't afford it, and since the public isn't willing to pay $5 for a gallon of milk or $10 a pound for ground beef, it isn't likely that there will be many farm kids in daycare.

Being on the farm with our kids is how they learn to be farmers. There aren't any schools that teach it the way it is learned through real experience.

Thank you for your article, and it is important to keep reminding us to be careful!

Michelle Kirk
Table Rock Farm
Biglerville, Pennsylvania

Mr. Smith,

Good article about the (Texas) legislative mood towards changing Capture. Certain forces are trying to pour cold water on any such change, talking it down every chance they get.

I attended the Symposium in Austin earlier this year on Capture and found the mood strong towards change.

A proper change in Capture would greatly enhance the authority of Groundwater Districts to properly do their job.

The 2nd Restatement of Torts Sec. 858 would be an excellent replacement. Groundwater districts could actually cut off all exports if springs or artesian flows are affected.

There seems to be people who want Groundwater Districts but don't want them to have much power.

Just a few observations, please check out www.cox-internet.com/water/.

Kenneth Schustereit

Mr. Schustereit,

We will continue to follow and report on efforts to manage water resources more effectively, more efficiently and fairly. See the article on Dell City, Texas, in this issue.

Ron Smith
Editor
Southwest Farm Press

Ron Smith,

Thanks for your commentary about outsourcing of jobs. Lately I've wondered if they've changed what I learned in Economics 101 that the sources of all wealth are the earth, capital or labor. If that has not changed does it mean that capital and labor in China will make America wealthier?

Harold Powell
powgraz@pldi.net

Water rights. Thanks for the water rights info.

Please keep the info coming and in the limelight.

Best wishes,

G.A. Gutmann