In a letter to the two chairmen, the organizations said attempts to re-introduce new payment limit provisions or transfer funding from commodity titles to other provisions would substantially alter policies in the new farm law.

The letter was sent to Rep. C.W. “Bill” Young (D-Fla.), chairman of the House Committee on Appropriations, and Rep. Henry Bonilla (R-Texas), chairman of that committee’s Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration and Related Agencies.

The groups said any proposals to modify the policies in the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 will undermine the effectiveness of that measure, which was signed into law on May 13.

The letter noted that the new farm law, which fully complies with the Concurrent Resolution on the Budget for Fiscal Year 2002, also meets the following key objectives:

1) Thwarts the need for future economic emergency assistance programs; 2) provides an adequate safety net for producers; 3) more sufficiently funds conservation programs; and 4) provides additional funding for rural development and research.

“The new farm bill provides an enhanced, predictable financial safety net in times of low prices, but the addition of a counter-cyclical provision ensures federal funds are only made available when low market prices trigger financial assistance,” the letter stated. “Any change in the levels and schedule of financial assistance will be detrimental to farm income and would surely undermine the confidence of lenders and suppliers. Farmers and ranchers must be given the opportunity to regain their footing and must be provided with a reliable safety net.”

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