Rains in the central and northern parts of the state should go a long way in relieving drought conditions, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service crops specialist.

“The rains we received in central and north Texas were significant in many areas,” said Dr. Travis Miller, AgriLife Extension agronomist and Texas A&M University soil and crop sciences associate department head. “I think in those areas we’re going to see greatly improved conditions in winter pastures, and hopefully put a little water in stock ponds and reservoirs.”

Most summer crops were already harvested in those parts of the state, so the rain won’t have an effect on those, Miller said. But raising soil-moisture reserves will certainly brighten the picture for winter grains and other fall-planted crops.

In the Texas High Plains, the cotton harvest was proceeding well, but any rain at this time would slow the harvest down and could reduce the quality of the crop, he noted.

Read more about Texas crops and weather.

 

 

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