SONORA – Rangeland burning classes have been scheduled at the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station near Sonora, Feb. 19-21 and March 4-6.

Prescribed burn programs have been effective and affordable method for controlling unwanted plant sources on rangeland. They can also enhance forage growth that benefits both livestock and wildlife.

Fire characteristics, fire equipment, benefits, burn planning and other topics will be part of the educational program.

Participants will develop a burning plan and participate in different activities during practice burns, said Ray Hinnant, one of the instructors for the academy and senior research associate with the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station.

They will observe a wide variety of rangelands, either depleted or covered by unwanted brush, Hinnant said, as well as view areas that are in the process of being restored, and rangeland that has been restored by fire and management.

Most of the workshops will be spent in the field learning and observing in small groups. “People attending this workshop will come away learning about the many benefits of prescribed burning as a range management tool,” Hinnant said.

Cost for each three-day workshop is $395. Lodging and meals will be provided. Space is limited and available on a first-come, first-serve basis. Separate sleeping arrangements will be available for men and women, with limited space available for couples.

Other instructors include Charles “Butch” Taylor, director of the Sonora Station; Mort Kothmann, professor at Texas A&M University; and Kent Mills, manager and consultant with Ezell Key Grain Co. Inc. in Snyder.

For more information, go to the Web at http://rangeweb.tamu.edu/arm or phone (979) 845-5580.

e-mail: b-fannin@tamu.edu