A typographical error in a recent story regarding trade with Cuba resulted in inflated numbers. The values should have been expressed as millions instead of billions. We regret the error and thank John S. Kavulich, Senior Policy Advisor, U.S.-Cuba Trade and Economic Council, Inc., for pointing out the error. Kavulich also provides the information below.

The following is a January 2005 through December 2005 update for exports from the United States to the Republic of Cuba relating to the Trade Sanctions Reform and Export Enhancement Act (TSRA) of 2000, which re-authorized the direct commercial (on a cash basis) export of food products (including branded food products) and agricultural products (commodities) from the United States to the Republic of Cuba, irrespective of purpose. The TSRA does not include healthcare products, which remain authorized by the Cuban Democracy Act of 1992 (CDA).

Dollar Value Of TSRA-Authorized Exports To Cuba
January 2005 US $30,470,181.00 29th of 220
February 2005 US $21,773,284.00 44th of 226
March 2005 US $41,886,797.00 24th of 218
April 2005 US $37,239,436.00 23rd of 222
May 2005 US $24,877,297.00 28th of 223
June 2005 US $33,712,960.00 25th of 224
July 2005 US $20,835,533.0 36th of 224
August 2005 US $29,778,271.00 27th of 225
September 2005 US $20,446,734.00 35th of 228
October 2005 US $23,559,583.00 39th of 228
November 2005 US $33,410,516.00 30th of 228

The following data represents the U.S. Dollar value of product exported from the United States to the Republic of Cuba under the auspice of TSRA. The data does not include transportation charges, bank charges, or other costs associated with exports from the United States to the Republic of Cuba.

The government of the Republic of Cuba reports data that, according to the government of the Republic of Cuba, includes transportation charges, bank charges, and other costs. However, the government of the Republic of Cuba has not provided any verifiable data to support their data. Thus, the use of trade data reported by the government of the Republic of Cuba is suspect. The government of the Republic of Cuba has been asked to provide verifiable data, but has chosen not to do so.

December 2005 (US $.00) compared to December 2004 (US $29,261,459.00) TRSA-authorized exports from the United States to the Republic of Cuba.

The reduction in exports from the United States to the Republic of Cuba in 2005 compared with 2004 is not a result of changes in payment regulations implemented by the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) of the United States Department of the Treasury in Washington, D.C.

Throughout 2005, representatives of Republic of Cuba government-operated Empresa Cubana Importadora Alimentos (Alimport), under the auspice of the Ministry of Foreign Trade of Cuba (MINCEX), reported that TSRA-authorized purchases by Alimport in 2005 would be substantially less than purchases in 2004.

However, in November 2005, a representative of Alimport reported that purchases by Alimport in 2005 would at least equal, but were expected to exceed TSRA-authorized purchases by Alimport in 2004. However, the representative of Alimport reported that the purchase values included transportation charges, bank charges, finance charges, and other costs, all of which are not independently verifiable.

The primary reasons for the reduction in exports to the Republic of Cuba are:

  1. Efforts by the government of the Republic of Cuba to increase the motivation of United States-based companies, organizations, state and local government representatives, and Members of the United States Congress to be more visible in their lobbying efforts for changes in United States policy, law, and regulations.

  2. Financial largess of the government of Venezuela lessens the interest of the government of the Republic of Cuba to purchase products from the United States, regardless of cost, quality, or delivery considerations.

  3. Financial largess of the government of the People's Republic of China lessens the interest of the government of the Republic of Cuba to purchase products from the United States, regardless of cost, quality, or delivery considerations.

    December 2005
    Total 2005 US $318,000,618.00.0 29th (of 228)
    Total 2004 US $391,990,382.00 25th (of 228)
    Total 2003 US $256,901,471.00 35th (of 219)
    Total 2002 US $138,634,784.00 50th (of 226)
    Total 2001 US $4,318,906.00 (Dec) 144th (of 226)
    Total TSRA Sale US $1,109,836,138.00
  4. Re-emergences and/or continuations of import relationships (barter, substantial credits, political motivation) with the governments of Brazil, Argentina, Vietnam, Mexico, Canada, and France among other countries.

Period U.S. Dollar Value Ranking
Jan. 2004 US $30,280,169.00 29th (of 202)
Feb. 2004 US $27,621,918.00 36th (of 214)
March '04 US $60,459,205.00 17th (of 218)
April 2004 US $55,232,424.00 19th (of 222)
May 2004 US $33,202,590.00 24th (of 223)
June 2004 US $39,874,688.00 18th (of 225)
July 2004 US $30,695,375.00 25th (of 225)
Aug. 2004 US $27,101,085.00 28th (of 226)
Sept. 2004 US $10,242,033.00 53rd (of 228)
Oct. 2004 US $19,402,481.00 41st (of 228)
Nov. 2004 US $28,616,955.00 35th (of 228)
Dec. 2004 US $29,261,459.00 30th (of 228)
Total 2004: US $391,990,382.00 25th (of 228)

John S. Kavulich is Senior Policy Advisor, U.S.-Cuba Trade and Economic Council, Inc. e-mail: council@cubatrade.orgInternet: http://www.cubatrade.org